After two weeks working as OPW intern for Mozilla, it's time for a recap!
What exactly I've been doing in these two weeks?

100 bugs triaged: achievement unlocked!

Yes, this is the thing I'm most proud of.

I'm a bit cheating here, as strictly speaking, since the beginning of the internship I've triaged only 44 bugs.
But I've decided to count from the beginning of my activity on bugzilla, at the end of March, since I've started work on that as part of the small contribution required for applying to OPW.
Therefore, it's all OPW related :)

Here's the grand total.

Right now, I've decided to work on an average of 5 bugs a day: it's mostly triage and/or verification, which is quite fun.
It consists in trying to have a more complete and detailed bug report for the developers: asking the right questions to the reporter, ensuring that the bug is filed against the right product or component and all the information about platforms and version are correct.

Or verifying that the bug isn't a duplicate, which involves doing some voodoo with Bugzilla quicksearch (I'm not so good with that yet, mostly because I'm not imaginative enough in the queries... but I'm getting better!)

Sometimes triaging means reading lots of documentation (to be sure that something is a bug and not a feature) and checking meta-bugs and release notes to be able to pinpoint the time when something was introduced and the reasoning behind it.
That takes a lot of time, but it makes you discover some funny things, like the Mighty Bouncing Unicorn.

And while I know it sounds a bit cruel, it's really good when you're verifying a fix and you find it's not totally ok, or that it triggered another bug.
I've been assured that feeling satisfied after that it's an essential part of the sadistic QA work.

Writing FAQs for new triager

This started as a personal project even before knowing I've been selected for OPW, and it's now part of my internship: I've been writing a first draft of FAQ for those who approach for the first time the Bug Triaging and Verifying work in Mozilla.

It meant taking a whole lot of IRC logs and scan them for the most asked questions during bugdays, and you can find here my first draft. I'll send a RFC today about it on dev-quality mailing list and link it to the main Bugdays page.

Lessons learned

So, what I've learned in these two weeks?

That I'm pretty good at figuring things alone, but I like to have feedback on what I'm working on.
That testing things is an art, and perfectionism is a big plus.
That there are such things as stupid questions, but you have to ask them nonetheless.
That people in the Mozilla community are quite friendly and not scary at all. Not even in video! :)

Wishlist

I've been thinking about this a lot, and I think I'd like to have

  • a guide to all the technical terms in the UI (it took me a while to figure out what exactly was the hamburger menu, or understand the difference between awesomebar, search bar and new tab search). This is essential when triaging or verifying theme related bugs, or UI bugs in general.

  • a big jargon/acronym file: m-c? UX? nightlies? australis? WFM? STR? m-a? Mozilla's people speak another language, especially in bug reports. You get familiar with that after a while, but at first glance can be quite obscure.

They will probably become my next pet project.